2008 Expedition

During our 2008 survey, using the Navy’s nuclear research submarine NR1, we searched 375 square miles of the North Sea.  We recorded and investigated 26 different wreck sites, some modern and some older and unidentified.  After many hours of data analysis, we have determined that none of those wrecks are likely to be the Bonhomme Richard. We will need to expand our search area and return again in a future expedition to continue this great quest!

We have been privileged to have the U.S. Navy as such a strong partner, and would like to thank the crews of NR1 and its support ship Carolyn Chouest for their outstanding contributions to the project.  Thank you to our individual and corporate sponsors for making this expedition possible!

NR1 alongside its support ship, Carolyn Chouest

NR1 alongside its support ship, Carolyn Chouest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carolyn Chouest

Carolyn Chouest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NR1 cruises by HMS Victory (tall ship in the background) at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, U.K.  HMS Victory is of similar historic significance and of the same time period as Bonhomme Richard.

NR1 cruises by HMS Victory (tall ship in the background) at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, U.K. HMS Victory is of similar historic significance and of the same time period as Bonhomme Richard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expedition Team Members:   Kevin Ridarelli (Archeology Intern, University of Connecticut), Melissa Ryan (Project Manager, Ocean Technology Foundation), George Schwarz (Archeologist, Naval Historical Center).  Not pictured:  Peter Reaveley, Historical Researcher.

Expedition Team Members: Kevin Ridarelli (Archeology Intern, University of Connecticut), Melissa Ryan (Project Manager, Ocean Technology Foundation), George Schwarz (Archeologist, Naval Historical Center). Not pictured: Peter Reaveley, Historical Researcher.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The conning station of NR1.

The conning station of NR1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The grand galley of NR1.  Note the tiny oven just above the corn dogs and tater tots.

The grand galley of NR1. Note the tiny oven just above the corn dogs and tater tot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twenty minutes at 400 degrees cooks just about anything in the freezer (below)!

Twenty minutes at 400 degrees cooks just about anything in the freezer (below)!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With 13 people on board and 4 bunks, some crew members had to sleep in the passageway and in the hanging rack above.

With 13 people on board and 4 bunks, some crew members had to sleep in the passageway and in the hanging rack above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are some of the wrecks we investigated.  It’s very challenging with poor visibility, and trying to maneuver a 150-foot submarine in powerful currents, but the NR-1 crew did a tremendous job and gave 110% to the effort.

A mass of tangled fishing nets makes this wreck difficult to see.

A mass of tangled fishing nets makes this wreck difficult to see.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The ship's frames are clearly visible in this wreck.

The ship’s frames are clearly visible in this wreck.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White coral is often found covering wrecks in the North Sea.

White coral is often found covering wrecks in the North Sea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frames and hatchways are still intact here.

Frames and hatchways are still intact here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The modern-looking bow of another wreck.

The modern-looking bow of another wreck.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A mess of frames and other unidentifiable materials (but the best visibility we had!)

A mess of frames and other unidentifiable materials (but the best visibility we had!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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